Fortysix + H

"Alles was wir sind, ist das ergebnis von dem was wir gedacht haben"
... - Bastian Schweinsteiger -
polyamorousmisanthrope:

cumaeansibyl:

pyrrhiccomedy:

hinoneko:

jonpertwee:

loudmusicandloudersex:

lightningstarborne:

why the fuck wouldn’t you read a book, unless you’re illiterate

This literally made me sad and I just want to go to sleep now

I think it’s because people are so stressed and working all the time. Less college grads read than high school grads — that should tell you something. Capitalism crushes the people’s souls.

Plus, think of the books you have to read for class in high school/college. Unless you really enjoy a certain type of literature (and/or have a really great teacher) a lot of it is going to feel like junk you’re forced to suffer through.
So for quite a few people, their perception of “adult” books is super-dense language and unpleasant subject matter, while the last books they really enjoyed reading on their own terms (like those 500+ installment chapter book series) might not be something they consider appropriate/appealing for people their age.

I’m calling bullshit on this whole infographic. How would they even collect this kind of information? I sure as hell don’t remember seeing any questions about my reading habits the last time I took the US Census. Who are they polling? What’s their sample size? What demographic did they poll? This stinks.
So: “RobertBrewer.org” is the personal website of a Christian pastor. On his own website, he explains that the data is has been attributed to something called ‘the Jenkins Group,’ which is a book publisher, not an independent polling agency, and certainly not an unbiased source of data when it comes to reading habits. Brewer also explains that the Jenkins Group itself distances itself from the statistics: they were informally presented by the owner of the company at a party, and were never actually published.
When I read that, I hear “the owner of a publishing company pulled these numbers out of his ass to impress his friends, but since he’s the boss we can’t just say that,” but draw your own conclusions.

thank you, this is ridiculous
like, just for instance, physically going into a bookstore has little or nothing to do, these days, with whether or not you read books
also maybe a lot of books go unfinished because of Sturgeon’s Law? you know, 90% of everything is crap? maybe people don’t finish the books they buy because they found out the books suck. (most of the time when I don’t finish a book it’s because another book appealed to me more.)
and for real, 80% of families not buying or reading any books doesn’t ring true for me at all. at the absolute minimum there are a lot of families with kids who are reading books for bedtime stories, for school, whatever. more like “80% of families didn’t buy or read books from us”

All I know is that this infographic makes me feel like Reader Georg.

polyamorousmisanthrope:

cumaeansibyl:

pyrrhiccomedy:

hinoneko:

jonpertwee:

loudmusicandloudersex:

lightningstarborne:

why the fuck wouldn’t you read a book, unless you’re illiterate

This literally made me sad and I just want to go to sleep now

I think it’s because people are so stressed and working all the time. Less college grads read than high school grads — that should tell you something. Capitalism crushes the people’s souls.

Plus, think of the books you have to read for class in high school/college. Unless you really enjoy a certain type of literature (and/or have a really great teacher) a lot of it is going to feel like junk you’re forced to suffer through.

So for quite a few people, their perception of “adult” books is super-dense language and unpleasant subject matter, while the last books they really enjoyed reading on their own terms (like those 500+ installment chapter book series) might not be something they consider appropriate/appealing for people their age.

I’m calling bullshit on this whole infographic. How would they even collect this kind of information? I sure as hell don’t remember seeing any questions about my reading habits the last time I took the US Census. Who are they polling? What’s their sample size? What demographic did they poll? This stinks.

So: “RobertBrewer.org” is the personal website of a Christian pastor. On his own website, he explains that the data is has been attributed to something called ‘the Jenkins Group,’ which is a book publisher, not an independent polling agency, and certainly not an unbiased source of data when it comes to reading habits. Brewer also explains that the Jenkins Group itself distances itself from the statistics: they were informally presented by the owner of the company at a party, and were never actually published.

When I read that, I hear “the owner of a publishing company pulled these numbers out of his ass to impress his friends, but since he’s the boss we can’t just say that,” but draw your own conclusions.

thank you, this is ridiculous

like, just for instance, physically going into a bookstore has little or nothing to do, these days, with whether or not you read books

also maybe a lot of books go unfinished because of Sturgeon’s Law? you know, 90% of everything is crap? maybe people don’t finish the books they buy because they found out the books suck. (most of the time when I don’t finish a book it’s because another book appealed to me more.)

and for real, 80% of families not buying or reading any books doesn’t ring true for me at all. at the absolute minimum there are a lot of families with kids who are reading books for bedtime stories, for school, whatever. more like “80% of families didn’t buy or read books from us

All I know is that this infographic makes me feel like Reader Georg.

(Source: vintageanchorbooks)

There are people out there, not all of them men, who believe that a conspiracy is going on. When I speak to them as a reporter, they tell me that that women lie about rape, now more than ever. They lie to damage men and to “destroy their lives”. This is despite the fact that the fraud rate for rape remains as low as ever, and despite the fact that popular culture is groaning with powerful men who have been accused or even convicted of sexual abuse and whose lives remain distinctly understroyed. Men like boxer like Mike Tyson, or singer R Kelly. Men like Woody Allen.

Women and children who bring those accusations, however, risk their relationships, their reputation, their safety. Anonymity in the press is no protection against the rejection of family, friends and workmates. Dylan Farrow is living somewhere out of the public eye, under a new name. We have created a culture and a legal system which punishes those who seek justice so badly that those who do come forward are assumed to have some ulterior motive.

Everyone has life experience. Yes, even you! You may think you’ve lived a completely ordinary, pedestrian life. I’ll let you in on a little secret: Most lives feel that way when you’re taking it a day at a time. Rock stars spend more time waiting on tour buses, or practicing music than they do performing, you know. You and your life is a unique perspective and you’ve got genuine value to offer, so start looking for it!

—The Polyamorous Misanthrope (via polyamorousmisanthrope)

Listen carefully to first criticisms made of your work. Note just what it is about your work that critics don’t like - then cultivate it. That’s the only part of your work that’s individual and worth keeping.

—Jean Cocteau (via writersrelief)

(via writeworld)

It’s okay to change your yes to a no. Yes’s aren’t permanent. They’re something we choose again and again, each and every day. Something we have the right to recall and reconsider as soon as saying yes no longer feels conducive to our wellbeing and happiness. It d.oesn’t matter whether you said yes to a job, a date, a relationship, sex, a favor to a friend, a social endeavor, or a vow of silence — you don’t ever have to commit to something that forces you to compromise who you are and what feels right; especially if it’s something you agreed to under pressure, intimidation, or force. Changing your yes to a no might make people angry. It might hurt their feelings, cause them to see you as a flake, and result in lost connections. But if saying no means staying true to yourself, honoring your feelings, and making self-care a priority, it’s worth it. You are worth it. Don’t let anyone convince you otherwise

—Daniell Koepke (via onlinecounsellingcollege)

(via april-polyverse)

Academics have developed complicated theories and obscure jargon in an effort to describe what is now referred to as structural racism, yet the concept is fairly straightforward. One theorist, Iris Marion Young, relying on a famous “birdcage” metaphor, explains it this way: If one thinks about racism by examining only one wire of the cage, or one form of disadvantage, it is difficult to understand how and why the bird is trapped. Only a large number of wires arranged in a specific way, and connected with one another, serve to enclose the bird and ensure it cannot escape.

What is particularly important to keep in mind is that any given wire of the cage may or may not be specifically developed for the purpose of trapping the bird, yet it still operates (together with other wires) to restrict its freedom.

Michelle Alexander, The New Jim Crow (via thenegrotude)

(Source: newwavefeminism, via april-polyverse)