Fortysix + H

"Alles was wir sind, ist das ergebnis von dem was wir gedacht haben"
... - Bastian Schweinsteiger -

Everyone has life experience. Yes, even you! You may think you’ve lived a completely ordinary, pedestrian life. I’ll let you in on a little secret: Most lives feel that way when you’re taking it a day at a time. Rock stars spend more time waiting on tour buses, or practicing music than they do performing, you know. You and your life is a unique perspective and you’ve got genuine value to offer, so start looking for it!

—The Polyamorous Misanthrope (via polyamorousmisanthrope)

Listen carefully to first criticisms made of your work. Note just what it is about your work that critics don’t like - then cultivate it. That’s the only part of your work that’s individual and worth keeping.

—Jean Cocteau (via writersrelief)

(via writeworld)

It’s okay to change your yes to a no. Yes’s aren’t permanent. They’re something we choose again and again, each and every day. Something we have the right to recall and reconsider as soon as saying yes no longer feels conducive to our wellbeing and happiness. It d.oesn’t matter whether you said yes to a job, a date, a relationship, sex, a favor to a friend, a social endeavor, or a vow of silence — you don’t ever have to commit to something that forces you to compromise who you are and what feels right; especially if it’s something you agreed to under pressure, intimidation, or force. Changing your yes to a no might make people angry. It might hurt their feelings, cause them to see you as a flake, and result in lost connections. But if saying no means staying true to yourself, honoring your feelings, and making self-care a priority, it’s worth it. You are worth it. Don’t let anyone convince you otherwise

—Daniell Koepke (via onlinecounsellingcollege)

(via april-polyverse)

Academics have developed complicated theories and obscure jargon in an effort to describe what is now referred to as structural racism, yet the concept is fairly straightforward. One theorist, Iris Marion Young, relying on a famous “birdcage” metaphor, explains it this way: If one thinks about racism by examining only one wire of the cage, or one form of disadvantage, it is difficult to understand how and why the bird is trapped. Only a large number of wires arranged in a specific way, and connected with one another, serve to enclose the bird and ensure it cannot escape.

What is particularly important to keep in mind is that any given wire of the cage may or may not be specifically developed for the purpose of trapping the bird, yet it still operates (together with other wires) to restrict its freedom.

Michelle Alexander, The New Jim Crow (via thenegrotude)

(Source: newwavefeminism, via april-polyverse)

A long time ago, when you were a wee thing, you learned something, some way to cope, something that, if you did it, would help you survive. It wasn’t the healthiest thing, it wasn’t gonna get you free, but it was gonna keep you alive. You learned it, at five or six, and it worked, it *did* help you survive. You carried it with you all your life, used it whenever you needed it. It got you out—out of your assbackwards town, away from an abuser, out of range of your mother’s un-love. Or whatever. It worked for you. You’re still here now partly because of this thing that you learned. The thing is, though, at some point you stopped needing it. At some point, you got far enough away, surrounded yourself with people who love you. You survived. And because you survived, you now had a shot at more than just staying alive. You had a shot now at getting free. But that thing that you learned when you were five was not then and is not now designed to help you be free. It is designed only to help you survive. And, in fact, it keeps you from being free. You need to figure out what this thing is and work your ass off to un-learn it. Because the things we learn to do to survive at all costs are not the things that will help us get FREE. Getting free is a whole different journey altogether.

Mia McKenzie, creator of Black Girl Dangerous, author of The Summer We Got Free  (via arabellesicardi)

This quote has really been on my mind lately. I’m so used to being a survivor that I find it hard to believe that I can also be a thriver.  (via april-polyverse)

(Source: etiquette-etc, via april-polyverse)